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LOL.  Bonus answer—

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We get along phenomenally well. It’s a real blessing working on these movies - Chris Evans

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I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain.
Jonathan Carroll (via danmaru)

(Source: quotethat)

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gazzymouse:

[ Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool in Fox’s unreleased Deadpool movie test footage ]

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ed-pool:

Game of Thrones Expectations Vs. Reality via Imugr

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langleav:

Wrote this today, hope you like it! ♥ Also, please remember to pre-order a copy of my new book Lullabies, available at all major bookstores. To get a special discount now, purchase online at Amazon, BN.com and The Book Depository. So much love to you all! xo Lang

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letterstomycountry:

Caption via A Mighty Girl:

The three women pictured in this incredible photograph from 1885 — Anandibai Joshi of India, Keiko Okami of Japan, and Sabat Islambouli of Syria — each became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries. The three were students at the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania; one of the only places in the world at the time where women could study medicine.As Mallika Rao writes in HuffPost, “If the timing doesn’t seem quite right, that’s understandable. In 1885, women in the U.S. still couldn’t vote, nor were they encouraged to learn very much. Popular wisdom decreed that studying was a threat to motherhood.” Given this, how did three women from around the world end up studying there to become doctors? The credit, according to Christopher Woolf of PRI’s The World, goes to the Quakers who “believed in women’s rights enough to set up the WMCP way back in 1850 in Germantown.”Woolf added, “It was the first women’s medical college in the world, and immediately began attracting foreign students unable to study medicine in their home countries. First they came from elsewhere in North America and Europe, and then from further afield. Women, like Joshi in India and Keiko Okami in Japan, heard about WMCP, and defied expectations of society and family to travel independently to America to apply, then figure out how to pay for their tuition and board… . Besides the international students, it also produced the nation’s first Native American woman doctor, Susan LeFlesche, while African Americans were often students as well. Some of whom, like Eliza Grier, were former slaves.”To read more about these women’s stories, check out the HuffPost article at http://huff.to/1egiYwT or listen to the PRI story at http://bit.ly/Q6TjLA

letterstomycountry:

Caption via A Mighty Girl:

The three women pictured in this incredible photograph from 1885 — Anandibai Joshi of India, Keiko Okami of Japan, and Sabat Islambouli of Syria — each became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries. The three were students at the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania; one of the only places in the world at the time where women could study medicine.

As Mallika Rao writes in HuffPost, “If the timing doesn’t seem quite right, that’s understandable. In 1885, women in the U.S. still couldn’t vote, nor were they encouraged to learn very much. Popular wisdom decreed that studying was a threat to motherhood.” Given this, how did three women from around the world end up studying there to become doctors? The credit, according to Christopher Woolf of PRI’s The World, goes to the Quakers who “believed in women’s rights enough to set up the WMCP way back in 1850 in Germantown.”

Woolf added, “It was the first women’s medical college in the world, and immediately began attracting foreign students unable to study medicine in their home countries. First they came from elsewhere in North America and Europe, and then from further afield. Women, like Joshi in India and Keiko Okami in Japan, heard about WMCP, and defied expectations of society and family to travel independently to America to apply, then figure out how to pay for their tuition and board… . Besides the international students, it also produced the nation’s first Native American woman doctor, Susan LeFlesche, while African Americans were often students as well. Some of whom, like Eliza Grier, were former slaves.”

To read more about these women’s stories, check out the HuffPost article at http://huff.to/1egiYwT or listen to the PRI story at http://bit.ly/Q6TjLA

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scienceyoucanlove:

Today on ‘just vaccinate your fucking children already’ news: 

Childhood vaccines are safe. Seriously.

By Jen Christensen and Nadia Kounang, CNN

(CNN) — Children should get vaccinated against preventable and potentially deadly diseases. Period.

That’s what a project that screened more than 20,000 scientific titles and 67 papers on vaccine safety concludes this week. The review appears in the latest edition of the medical journal Pediatrics.

The evidence strongly suggests that side effects from vaccines are incredibly rare, the study authors said. They found no ties between vaccines and the rising number of children with autism, as a small but vocal group of anti-vaccine activists, including actors Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carey, have said.

(Retracted autism study an ‘elaborate fraud’)

The review also found no link between vaccines and childhood leukemia, something that was suggested inearlier studies.

The researchers found that some vaccines did cause a few adverse effects but it was only for a tiny fraction of the population.

There was evidence that the meningococcal vaccine can lead to anaphylaxis — a severe, whole-body allergic reaction — in children allergic to ingredients in the vaccine. Other studies found the MMR vaccine was linked to seizures.

"Vaccines, like any other medication, aren’t 100% risk free," said Dr. Ari Brown an Austin, Texas-based pediatrician and author of the popular book “Baby 411,” who was not involved with the study.

"You have a sore arm, redness at the injection site. Those are the things we see commonly. Fortunately the serious adverse effects is extremely rare."

Brown said parents ask her how safe vaccines are all the time. Some patients also ask if they should delay or stagger the vaccinations. She counsels against that practice. She said the younger the child, the more danger these diseases present.

"By delaying the vaccines you’re putting your child at risk," Brown said.

(Study: Don’t delay measles vaccine)

The positive effects of vaccines dramatically outweigh the bad, experts said.

An editorial accompanying the study calls vaccines “one of the most successful public health achievements of the 20th century.”

Because of vaccines, many diseases that plagued children for centuries have all but been eliminated.

"There were good reasons that these diseases were targeted for vaccine development since they are so life-threatening," said Dr. Carrie Byington, vice-chair for research in the University of Utah’s pediatrics department, and the new chair for the American Academy of Pediatrics committee on infectious diseases.

Millions of Americans live longer on average because of the protection vaccines provide. Life expectancy has gone up in the United States by more than 30 years. Infant mortality decreased from 100 deaths per 1000 to 7 between the 1900s and 2000. 

read more from CNN (also links to study findings are in parentheses throughout the text)

also CNN link, goes to article and video, video starts on it’s own so be careful.

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9gag:

That feeling when you’re too tired to focus on anything. #9gag

Always.

9gag:

That feeling when you’re too tired to focus on anything. #9gag

Always.